20 Publishers that Pay For Writing About Writing

Want to get paid to write about writing? Then check out this list of publishers that cover the topic of writing.

A friendly reminder: Please carefully study each publication before submitting a pitch. Make sure you know where in the publication your piece would fit, and that it would, indeed, be a topic that the editor would be interested in. Before sending a pitch, I highly recommend watching this free lecture.

– Jacob Jans

Authors Publish publishes articles about various aspects of writing and publishing. They pay between $35 and $50 per article. To learn more, read their submission guidelines.

The SFWA Blog is the official blog for the Science Fiction & Fantasy Writers of America. They want nonfiction articles of interest to sci-fi/fantasy writers. They pay 8 cents a word, up to 1,000 words. To learn more, read their submission guidelines.

Poets & Writers Magazine is a bimonthly magazine “for writers of poetry, fiction and creative nonfiction.” It reaches a national audience of 100,000 readers. According to the magazine’s website, they pay the writers when their piece is scheduled for production. The reports suggest that they are paid around 17 cents per word. To learn more, refer to their submission guidelines.

Author Magazine is a website published by the Pacific Northwest Writer’s Association. Their mission is to “develop writing talent through education, participation, and accessibility. They publish how to articles about writing, as well as emotional/inspirational articles for writers. They pay $50 for these articles. They also pay $30 for book reviews. To learn more, read their submission guidelines.

Craft is an online publication that focuses on the “craft of writing and how those elements make a good story great.” They have two separate submission categories based on the submitted work’s length. These categories are flash fiction (for work less than 1,000 words) and short fiction (for work less than 7,000 words). For flash fiction, they pay their writers a flat rate of $100, while for original short fiction, they pay $0.10/word up to $200. For more details, refer to this page.

The Writer is a magazine that gives professional and aspiring writers a “comprehensive how-to advice on the craft of writing.” They are looking for reported pieces, how-to stories, profiles and narrative essays. The length of their articles varies from 300 to 3,000 words. According to payment reports, they pay up to $0.40 per word. To learn more, read their submission guidelines.

The Writer’s Chronicle is the official publication of the Association of Writers and Writing Programs. The magazine has been in circulation for over four decades, and it is one of the most respected writing magazines. They accept submissions of interviews, pedagogical essays, craft essays, and other areas. They pay $18 per 100 words up to a maximum 7,000 words ($1,260). To learn more, read their submission guidelines.

Copy Hackers teaches people how to “write copy that converts.” They promise to help people “write more persuasive, believable and usable copy.” They want writers to send pitch emails to their content strategist. They do not want unsolicited drafts. They pay $325 per post. To learn more, refer to this page.

Freedom With Writing is a website and email newsletter that publishes articles about paid writing opportunities. They also publish ebooks. Their focus is on helping writers get paid. Pay starts at $50 for lists of publishers that pay writers, more for longer lists. To learn more, read their submission guidelines.

Submittable is a widely-used submissions portal that publishes its own blog. They accept articles that discuss publishing or digital media. They’re also looking for book reviews and essays on any topic, as long as they “of high literary quality.” They pay $50 per post. To learn more, read their submission guidelines.

Funds for Writers publishes a weekly newsletter that showcases paying markets, grants, contests, and other opportunities to make money with writing. They’re looking for original articles about any sort of financial tips or paying markets for writers. For a 500-600 word article, they pay $50 if by PayPal and $45 if by check. For reprints, they pay $15 if by PayPal and $10 if by check. To learn more, read their submission guidelines.

WritersHQ is a UK based company that offers training and retreats for writers. On their blog, they publish blog posts “of between 500 – 800 words examining writing and the writing process from a new perspective.” They also seek posts on monthly themes. They pay £40 for all posts. To learn more, read their submission guidelines.

Wow! Women on Writing publishes articles on the topic of writing, including how-to’s about writing and publishing and interviews with editors/agents. They pay $50 to $75 per post, and sometimes up to $150. To learn more, read their submission guidelines.

Make A Living Writing helps writers all over the world find real success in their careers. They accept queries for guest posts that provide “firsthand, practical advice” to freelance writers. In order to query, you must either be a current or former member of the Freelance Writers’ Den or a student or graduate of Jon Morrow’s blog mentoring program. However, they do run open pitch periods. They pay $50 per guest post. To learn more, read their submission guidelines.

Writers Weekly publishes articles that help writers increase their income. They accept queries for guest posts that focus on selling the written word. They pay $60 for features. To learn more, read their submission guidelines.

Writer’s Digest is a widely-read and well-respected magazine about the art of writing. They accept both manuscript submissions and queries for articles that “inform, instruct, and inspire” readers. Writers can submit to any of their departments, including their “5-Minute Memoir,” “Reject a Hit,” and writing technique sections. They pay between 30 and 50 cents a word for articles up to 2,400 words ($720-$1,200), and they also work with a 25% kill fee. To learn more, read their submission guidelines.

Barefoot Writer Magazine helps writers learn how to earn money, work from home and get freelance jobs to achieve the lifestyle of their dreams. Their readers include men and women of all ages who want to make money from writing. They pay $100 to $300 per article. To learn more, read their submission guidelines.

Craft Your Content provides “editing and proofreading services to authors and entrepreneurial writers who want to rise above the noise and publish excellent written material.” They are looking for writers who have “something brilliant to say about writing and entrepreneurship.” They pay $75 to $150 per article, depending on its length, topic, and quality. To learn more, visit this page.

NicoleDieker.com is a website that features “daily posts on the art and the finances of a creative career.” They are seeking guest posts (of at least 1,000 words) that give “personal insight to any aspect of the creative practice.” They publish two guest posts per month and pay $50 per piece. For details, visit this page.

Writing Class Radio is “a podcast of a writing class.” The podcast is for people who love true stories, and want to learn about how to write their own stories. They are looking for true and personal stories of 850 to 1,500 words. They pay $50 to $100 to storytellers who are aired on the podcast. For details, read their submissions guidelines.

 

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